Sutton Coldfield Town Hall: A relic of municipality in a royal borough

9 05 2007

Sutton town hall facadeSutton Coldfield is probably one of the most unique of Birmingham’s suburbs in that it seems so much like a separate entity to Birmingham. Well, up until 1974, it was. Sutton Town Hall is a beautiful structure standing as a reminder to all lifelong residents of Sutton Coldfield that they once governed themselves.

Sutton Coldfield is known still, despite being incorporated into the City of Birmingham, as the Royal Borough of Sutton Coldfield. It’s history is certainly connected to the monarchy through land purchases. Wooded areas in Sutton have fluctuated between Chase and Forest with the name Forest being given to those owned by the Royal Family. This is largely forgotten now and most of the wooded areas have either been destroyed through the ever expanding area or protected in the vast expanses of the time capsule that is Sutton Park, the largest urban nature reserve in Europe.

Sutton Clock towerSutton Coldfield really grew in the 19th Century. The advent of the railways played such a major role in the prosperity of the town (though Bishop Vesey’s activities as Bishop of Exeter were also a key factor in the prosperity of the town) permitting industries to establish in the area. Sutton Coldfield followed the example of Birmingham in industry, undertaking various manufacturing processes – however, it was not rewarded with that of Birmingham which expanded absorbing various other boroughs and towns within it’s vicinity.

Sutton Hall facadeThe town was obviously proud to be part of the railway culture. It constructed a major railway station with ornate decorations. To make sure all visitors felt welcomed in the town, a grand hotel was constructed on a small right of land rising above the train station. The Royal Hotel, again reflecting the royal history of the town, opened in 1865 and immediately finances became a major problem. This is understandable when you look at the architecture. The railway station in Sutton was small compared to many others and the hotel was huge – obviously expecting a huge flow of visitors. They splashed out on the architectural features and internal decor, ignoring the fact that this was a make or break situation. As times passed, it became clear it was going to break and in 1895, it closed. For a short time the building was occupied by the Sutton Coldfield Sanatorium but in December 1901 was sold for £9,000 to the Sutton Corporation to serve as Council Offices.

The Sutton Corporation took the opportunity to refurbish the building and extend it. The fire headquarters opened first and a few months later in 1906, the main offices opened to a major ceremony consisting of performances for various local artists. It was undoubtedly a major highlight in the Sutton Corporation’s history.

1974 spelled an end of an era for Sutton Coldfield as it was moved into the newly created West Midlands Metropolitan County and became a part of the City of Birmingham. Many residents opposed this in the worry that they would lose their identity. This they may have lost and Sutton did lose a lot of light as a result of Birmingham’s focus of investment on the city centre and not on the suburbs – Sutton is still feeling the effects and is only just starting to pick up in the last few years.

The Sutton Corporation disappeared and the hall lost all use as offices. A section was used for neighbourhood offices, and still does today, but there was still a huge portion of the building requiring maintenance and general TLC. Well, it was reverted back to an old usage that it had been once before; a theatre. Between World War I and World War II, it was used as a theatre for the decommissioned soldiers and proved successful until its later years.

The town hall now serves as a theatre, social function venue, wedding venue and as neighbourhood offices for the Sutton Coldfield parliamentary constituency and for the four wards which it is associated with. Productions hosted by the town hall include those by the two local selective grammar schools; Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School and Sutton Coldfield Girls’ Grammar School.

Architecturally, this building does appear a bit of a mess from the front. It is clear to distinguish the 1906 from the original hotel. But upon close analysis, a certain beauty can be taken from the building. The windows are large and mismatched creating an interesting pattern on the façade. The clock tower is beautiful and to think that it was once used as a fire tower for the fire headquarters sounds like a crime! The building does not appear as a council building at all, but it does appear to be of a municipal nature.

Features which may interest the least-interested of visitors include the retention of the Sutton Coldfield Coat of Arms above the entrance. The arms have been absorbed into the Birmingham Coat of Arms but they were not removed from the building. They are engraved into stone and are losing the defined edges after years of wear.

The building should remain to make a positive impact on the landscape and now stands as one of three points on the skyline of Sutton Coldfield – Holy Trinity Church, Sutton Town Hall and Sutton Coldfield television mast. I recommend you take a visit to this building, especially if a production is to be unveiled there. The interior décor is intricate to say the least – yet another indication of Sutton’s royal heritage?

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One response

10 05 2009
matt murdock

yes,i do vaguely remember when Sutton coldfield first became a suburb of Birmingham.what a more wonderful place it has become ever since.

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